Tag Archive: comedy


One of the great comedy schools/troops in LA is the Groundlings. We have friends in the group, and a few of us visited one of their shows last year and caught the following sketch which just fit our site TOO perfectly to be a… well, you know…

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMIbtJcQtqs

This sketch actually touches perfectly on what we run into when we look at a fun set of coincidences, or synchronicity, and start overanalyzing it. How far do you have to stretch to find the similarities, and at what point do you cut them off? One of the characters is straight, one gay, and something tells me Julian is ambidextrous*, so for the characters that seemed like a natural point to draw the line. But they could have drawn it sooner if they wanted to be much more technical. I mean, sure, they all had iPhones, but were they all iPhone 4s? Julia’s appeared to be white on the back, and as any self-respecting geek knows, the iPhone 4 wasn’t released in white until this year, branding Julia as a witch who must be burned at the stake an outlier from the pattern they were searching for much earlier than the moment their love lives came into play.

Simply¬†enough, craziness like this happens all the time when we’re looking for it, and is easy to tear apart when we want to. The real trick is in finding the fun in it no matter what, and not letting it color your view of the world or the people around you. You see it when people who have the same religion analyze their same book differently, or two members of the same political party can ascribe to completely different ideals. In the real world these tiny lines drawn in the sand over what point we consider incredibly similar people to be outsiders can lead to massive issues. But personally, I’m going to stick to my world, where these lines lead to sketch comedy, laughs, and racial stereotyping that’s funny because we’re not racist. We swear.

*Yes, that was a joke. Obviously I meant bilateral.

One of our favorite people, Julia Sweeney, gives a little perspective on how her view of coincidences changed, and arguably became more fun:

Julia¬†hits the nail on the head about what we do here. It doesn’t matter why coincidences happen, only that they do, and they’re frakkin’ cool when they do. And they’re even more fun when you remember to submit them to us! Hint, hint. Hint.

Hint.

Okay, that’s enough hinting.

(See what I did there?)