Pages Menu
Categories Menu

Posted on Mar 21, 2013 in arguments, critical thinking, gender, local, Marywood University, responding to arguments | 11 comments

“Women’s center” at Marywood University – I’m skeptical

image credit: teamawot.com
Sexual assault is a problem men and women face. A “women’s center,” excluding men, should not be welcome at Marywood University.

A graduate student at the university I attend — Marywood University in Scranton, Pennsylvania — is lobbying for a woman’s center to be included on campus. This prospective women’s center is proposed as a place where women are provided resources and information pertaining to sexual assault including “information, seminars, and assistance” according to an article in the university newspaper — The Wood Word — titled “Graduate student lobbying for women’s center on campus.”

Jennifer Mudge, the student spearheading this initiative, says that the center would provide “all students” such services and would be “inclusive,” [not only for victims of sexual assault, Mudge says] but the idea for the center has a very clear problem – men, according to the name of the prospective center, are excluded. The idea is to have a women’s center, not, for instance, a ‘sexual assault center’ or a ‘victim’s resource center,’ and is thus a poor exclusionary idea which ought to be reframed or scrapped altogether. I will argue that the center is poorly presented not only because it excludes men, but also because the reasoning for the center is deeply flawed – there is little to no good evidence that there is a need for a women’s center, or even any center pertaining to sexual assault, at Marywood Uuniversity.

Campus services at Marywood University should be offered to all individuals regardless of gender identification but, according to the article, the women’s center will not do that; men — including gay men and transgender individuals identifying as men — are excluded from the women’s center.  This assumption is not just one from looking at the name of the center, but also from what Mudge offers in the article – “one in five college-age women will be sexually assaulted” Mudge says. Men are completely unmentioned while women are mentioned throughout. The concern does not appear to be sexual assault that all people — regardless of gender identification — face, but rather sexual assault women face.

Mudge notes that, when she was working with the Women’s Recourse Center in Scranton, she did not see a college-aged population which was consistent with the ‘1 in 5 women’ statistic she provides. The article, quoting Mudge, says, “We know [sexual assault] is happening regardless of how safe the campus is or how great the university is.” How do we know sexual assault is happening? Mudge simply assumes sexual assault is happening. She appears to extrapolate from statistics presumably representative of a whole — not Marywood University — in order to arrive at this conclusion. She appears to have a preconceived notion of the way things are and, when confronted with contrary information (a lack of sexual assault [reporting] at Marywood University), she clings to her belief rather than doubting the statistic. The article also notes that Mudge, through “conversations with individuals,” “have discovered that there is a discrepancy between what the university reports and what actually occurs.” We see no evidence whatsoever and just simply have to ‘take the word’ not only of Mudge, but also the accounts of the individuals.

The article notes that from 2011-2012, “there were four reported cases of sexual assault in 2011” at Marywood University. Dr. Amy Pacjej-Woodruff — dean of students at Marywood University — says that these reports “are only indicative of the cases which actually go through the conduct process.” Well, of course they are; Pacjej-Woodruff states the obvious with what seems to be some slippery language assuming that more cases of sexual assault exist when we have no reason (at least from what she provides) to assume this. It is also important to note that the reports of sexual assault — a grand total of four reports in a two-year period — are not necessarily indicative of four instances of sexual assault occurring on campus; the accusations may have been false and/or unfounded. Reports are much different than incidents of sexual assault.

Mudge, responding to comments from Pacjej-Woodruff, asserts that many instances of sexual assault go unreported due to stigmas associated with sexual assault. Even if this is the case, and I am sure that it is in some instances, this does not mean that there is a problem of sexual assault at Marywood University. If there is indeed a stigma associated with reporting sexual assault, this stigma almost certainly applies to men and women alike.

Is there a need for a women’s center, or better yet, a victim’s resource center at Marywood University? According to the presented data (four reports in the span of two years and anecdotal testimony relayed by a third-party) there does not appear to be a need for any sort of center.

If Marywood University does go ahead with plans for a center providing information and resources concerning sexual assault, it should not be a women’s center. A center pertaining to sexual assault should be for everyone – a victim’s resource center instead of a women’s resource center.  Marywood University will unsuccessfully confront a problem of sexual assault — if it even exists at Marywood University — if Marywood only provides resources for women while completely ignoring the needs of men. Campus resources which are exclusionary on the basis of gender should not be tolerated at Marywood University. Men are also victims of sexual assault and should not be ignored.

  • The women’s center where I used to live (Placerville, Ca), changed their name to “Center for Violence-Free Relationships” because they know not only women are victims of abuse and because violence in relationships often goes both ways and that treating both partners is more effective than just treating one. They started offering classes designed around Marshall Rosenberg’s Non-Violent Communication. Very powerful stuff. Perhaps you could suggest something like it to them.

  • Stefano S.

    Silly you, we all know men can’t and don’t get raped! A women’s center is truly necessary to avoid the sexist, patriarchal oppression and rapist attitude caused simply by being near men ;)

  • blondein_tokyo

    There is no question it is needed; the question is why they are excluding men. Men need this resource just as much as women. Is there any information provided as to their reasoning on excluding them?

    • None at all. The article does not mention men and, as the name of this prospective center implies, only is concerned with women who are victims of sexual assault.

  • “this does not mean that there is a problem of sexual assault at Marywood University.”

    Haven’t you heard about the mandatory Skepticism Exception Rule? A problem exists every time a woman claims one exists. To question that is to be… well, skeptical. And that’s just Wrong. Remember, when it comes to feminist claims, skepticism is proof of misogyny.

  • Michael Coon

    By all means, be skeptical Justin. But also be fair. Here is a quote from the article you linked to; “According to Mudge, a women’s center would provide all students with a place to go to for information, seminars, and assistance. “The intention is for it to be inclusive [so] you don’t have to have been sexually assaulted to use the center,” she said.” Skepticism is good. Reading comprehension is better.

    She said “all students” who don’t have to have been “sexually assaulted” can use the center. I think you may be fixating on the name of the center. The way I read it she did not exclude men. You should learn more about this proposal beyond the article says (we all know how news articles can misrepresent what they are attempting to report on).

    • The context of the word “inclusive” is clearly in reference to >women< who are or are not victims of sexual assault:

      "According to Mudge, a women’s center would provide all students with a place to go to for information, seminars, and assistance.“The intention is for it to be inclusive [so] you don’t have to have been sexually assaulted to use the center,” she said."

      It's obviously not a center for everyone if it is a WOMEN's center – a center for women. Mudge completely ignores men.

      • Michael Coon

        Respectfully disagree. You are fixating on the name and ignoring her words. She said “all students”. But maybe you can persuade her and the U to change the name of the center.

  • Michael Coon

    Not sure why, but the original of this does not appear in my browser – if this is a duplicate please accept my apologies and delete-

    By all means, be skeptical Justin. But also be fair. Here is a quote
    from the article you linked to; “According to Mudge, a women’s center
    would provide all students with a place to go to for information,
    seminars, and assistance. “The intention is for it to be inclusive [so]
    you don’t have to have been sexually assaulted to use the center,” she
    said.” Skepticism is good. Reading comprehension is better.

    She
    said “all students” who don’t have to have been “sexually assaulted” can
    use the center. I think you may be fixating on the name of the center.
    The way I read it she did not exclude men. You should learn more about
    this proposal beyond the article says (we all know how news articles can
    misrepresent what they are attempting to report on).

  • MosesZD

    They don’t know. The 1-in-5 number was made up out of whole cloth. The sexual assualt rate (which includes non-rape such as groping) is absurdly low compared to the claims made by the feminists:

    From 1995 to 2010, the estimated annual rate of female rape or sexual assault victimizations declined 58%, from 5.0 victimizations per 1,000 females age 12 or older to 2.1 per 1,000.

    Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 1994–2010

    You can’t get from 2.1% to 20% without lying. Rape, which is a subset of sexual assault, came in at 0.9/1000. Most of which didn’t come from ‘creeps in elevators’ but step-fathers, relatives and boyfriends (78%).

    Now, if we’re talking non-violent coercion (begging, whining, fighting, guilt-tripping, that sort of crap)… Then you can get to that number. But women aren’t the sole victims or innocent players in this area. Men and women are reasonably equally guilty though the stats say women are the greater offenders and men the greater victims in this area, though not by a tremendous amount.

    I think the biggest probem we have with discussing rape, sexual coercion and related is the stereotypes perpetrated by society( and feminists ) of women’s physical weakness, disinterest in sex, sex-role passiveness and gentle
    nature lead many people to assume that women are not capable of such an act.

    And I’m not letting men off the hook. But I’m sick and tired of feminist power-plays and disinformation. Women are, frankly, just as big a group of dysfunctional, abusive assholes (as a population) as men. And this is a societal problem that cuts across both genders.