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Posted by on Apr 9, 2013 in Culture | 6 comments

The Amazing Meeting – 2013

Just a reminder! And, as An Ardent Skeptic points out below “There are three scholarship programs mentioned on the TAM2013 website.  And, a JREF membership lowers the price by $50 (the early registration fee without member discount was $425, BTW, but early registration pricing ended on March 31st).”

  • Mikail2

    $475 is a pretty ridiculous price, don’t you think? is the skeptic community trying to only appeal to the elite of society?

  • RussellBlackford

    I don’t have anything to do with the pricing – but when you’re paying transport and accommodation for such a large number of (high quality) guest speakers it’s going to be expensive to run a conference. It would be even more so if we didn’t all waive fees for speaking. And I doubt that there is any university or government funding available, which allows many other conferences to be subsidised. In the circs, I agree it’s a pretty big commitment to go to it, but no I wouldn’t call it a ridiculous price for what is on offer.

  • Mikail2

    Thanks. I appreciate you taking the time to explain that to me. I apologize if I gave you the impression that I thought you have something to do with the pricing. That wasn’t my intent.

    For me and a lot of people, this is quite expensive. Bruce Gerencser just recently wrote a post about how the skeptical community can have a broader appeal. He said expensive conference fees are not helping in this area. I agree with him, but that’s our opinion and reasonable people can disagree on this. .

  • An Ardent Skeptic

    There are three scholarship programs mentioned on the TAM2013 website. And, a JREF membership lowers the price by $50 (the early registration fee without member discount was $425, BTW, but early registration pricing ended on March 31st).

    Part of the high pricing for conferences run by large skeptic organizations is that they are also a major source of funding for those organizations. (Skeptics don’t have weekly services during which they pass the offering plate. 😉

    Russell, it might help to include a mention about the TAM scholarship programs in this post. A mention might help the fundraising efforts for these programs, and make people aware that there are scholarships available. Just a suggestion. 🙂

  • RussellBlackford

    I have added some words to the post from An Ardent Skeptic’s comment. It’s also true that a conference like this must run at a good profit, as it is one of the few ways for an organisation like JREF to raise money. Such organisations need money if they are to carry out their operations – even core costs such as staff salaries and wages, rents, and insurance are likely to be substantial.

  • An Ardent Skeptic

    Thanks for the edit and this additional comment, Russell!

    I have often heard the concerns about the high pricing for skeptic conferences. Sometimes people compare the pricing to the professional conferences they attend, and say that skeptic conferences are much higher priced. I think it is important to remember that professional conferences generally have large vendor trade shows associated with them and/or corporate sponsorship that help keep the costs lower for attendees. Corporations do this for marketing reasons, obviously. I don’t think that most corporations would consider skeptic events to be a worthwhile utilization of their marketing funds. 😉