• ‘No-Go Zones’ In America!

    danger-no-go-zone-signFox News has recently reported that in France and England, there are many areas so controlled by Muslims that non-Muslims aren’t allowed in. They call these areas, “No-Go Zones.”

    As it turns out — surprise, surprise — Fox News lied. There are no areas in France or England where non-Muslims are restricted. Here is what I find interesting. Fox News propagated this made-up story because they wanted to scare people into believing that Muslims are taking over and that they are restricting the freedom of non-Muslims.  But the sad fact is that there really are “No-Go Zones” all over the world; even in America.

    However, it isn’t just Muslims, but theists in general that are restricting the freedom of non-theists. There are plenty of places in America and the rest of the world where being an open atheist invites violence from “peace-loving” religious believers. There are areas all over the world where proclaiming one’s lack of belief in deities will make someone dramatically less safe.

    I live in the suburbs of Philadelphia and I am also not a particularly big guy. In fact, I am a very small individual and that is one of the reasons why I rarely wear an openly atheist t-shirt out in public. I fear that there will be some Christian who will get up in my face and threaten or attack me. That is why I tend to only wear my atheist t-shirts in places where there are other atheists — Safety in numbers. Sometimes I will wear some of my less obvious atheist shirts, but even then, there are places I won’t go. There are “No-Go Zones.”

    Are there places in America so controlled by religion that they are “No-Go Zones” for atheists? I’m going to say YES!!! Most of America is a “No-Go Zone” for atheists. Do you have a story of being physically attacked or threatened by religious believers for being an atheist? Have you experienced an atheist “No-Go Zone?” Leave a comment below.

    Category: AtheismfeaturedReligionViolence

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    Article by: Staks Rosch

    Staks Rosch is a writer for the Skeptic Ink Network & Huffington Post, and is also a freelance writer for Publishers Weekly. Currently he serves as the head of the Philadelphia Coalition of Reason and is a stay-at-home dad.

    7 comments

    1. Not just religious lunatics. Neo-nazis have a long habit of creating no-go areas in Germany. I’m surprised anyone doubts other violent groups would be less successful

    2. This sort of thing is the basis for claims like this.

      http://youtu.be/rcsG-u2GtZE

      It’s a problem for the local communities that’s peculiar to the more extreme Islam and the way in which those communities are having to come to terms with it.

      Many Muslims seem to be stuck between decrying this sort of behaviour and being seen to criticise these Muslims in favour of non-Islamic cultural freedoms of the west. As well as some of the points addressed in this report it also seems to stem from the mono-culture that is Islam where all Muslims are supposed to favour Muslims against Kafir and the use of Takfir, the denouncing of other Muslims as being un-Islamic for not practising the requirements of the faith – the irony being that nearly all Muslims consider many other Muslims the be un-Islamic, until it comes to some cultural clash with Kafir, when all of a sudden all Muslims stand together.

      I’ve not seen any recent reports of this ‘No Go’ problem in London, but the complexity of the problem has widened, with reports of Islamist control of school governors, and then the problem British Muslims being dawn to Syria and ISIS, bringing us to the latest source of friction, the letter from the UK government to Muslim leaders: http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/jan/19/david-cameron-backs-eric-pickles-letter-muslim-leaders

      Outside the Islamic context there are areas in the UK where I think twice about entering at night on foot, but mainly because of specific crime and gang problems. But these are isolated cases from small groups of individuals and are not associated with a sub-culture such as extreme Islam. The sub-culture nature in the case of Islam is more wide spread because these groups do not work in isolation but are connected across Britain and Europe. Read the book from Maajid Nawaz, ‘Radical: My Journey from Islam’ for a feel for how this goes on.

        1. Yes I did. It said this: “Fox News propagated this made-up story because they wanted to scare people into believing that Muslims are taking over and that they are restricting the freedom of non-Muslims.”

          And though the particular Fox News may be entirely made up, the basis for that sort of report is what I was responding with, which has substance to it, because of the problems specific to Islam in Britain and Europe generally, the problem of the lack of integration of Muslims, and the more recent radicalisation of many Muslims.

          “There are areas all over the world where proclaiming one’s lack of belief in deities will make someone dramatically less safe.”

          Quite. And mostly in Islamic states. And Muslims are also victims, not only atheists and people of other religions.

          Perhaps you thought I missed this: “Do you have a story of being physically attacked or threatened by religious believers for being an atheist? Have you experienced an atheist “No-Go Zone?” Leave a comment below.”

          But then that wasn’t prescribing exclusive comment in that regard only.

          Is there something else you think I missed?

    3. I’ve certainly been threatened by Christians, but the threats generally involve the hell in which they believe rather than physical violence. But like you, I do not wear anything that would identify me as an atheist. I have little doubt that doing so where I live would be risky.

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