• Religions Are Not People My Friend

    Atheists are often criticized for criticizing religion and for even mocking religion at times. This is seen as being mean toward religious believers. Most atheists I know tend to be very nice people. We aren’t mean toward religious believers at all; we are mean toward religions. There is a big difference between the two.

    Being mean toward people is rarely acceptable. Mocking an idea that one finds ridiculous, on the other hand, is perfectly acceptable. Religions are not people. You can’t hurt Christianity’s feelings. Christianity doesn’t even pay taxes. Christians however are people and they should be respected as people.

    The problem is that Christians often incorrectly believe that any criticism or mockery of their religion is a criticism or mockery of them. It isn’t! Atheists within the greater community of reason continue to hold to the view that all ideas should be subjected to skepticism, criticism, and even mockery if the idea is particularly ridiculous. We don’t give religious ideas (i.e. beliefs) a pass from that.

    Blasphemy is a victimless crime. Religions aren’t people and can’t be victims of blasphemy. Religious believers can be victims. However, more times than not, religious believers tend to be the ones who victimize others… often times they even victimize religious believers of a different religion or of people in their own religion who they have some difference with.

    So if religions aren’t people, what are they? More often than not, religions are corporations. They have a mission to make money and avoid paying their fair share of taxes. They even market a product like most corporations. In this case their products are God, salvation from sin, eternal paradise, etc. Interestingly enough, those products aren’t real. Religions aren’t just corporations; they are corrupt corporations running multi-nation scams.

    Happy Blasphemy Day!

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    Category: AtheismFree SpeechReligion

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    Article by: Staks Rosch

    Staks Rosch is a writer for the Skeptic Ink Network & Huffington Post, and is also a freelance writer for Publishers Weekly. Currently he serves as the head of the Philadelphia Coalition of Reason and is a stay-at-home dad.

    4 comments

    1. That is an excellent point, one that I’ve made before. Because people are so emotionally linked to their religious beliefs and their beliefs make up much of their personal self-image, any attack on their beliefs will automatically be seen as a direct personal attack on their person. While you and I both see this as fallacious, a huge number of believers simply cannot separate their beliefs from themselves under any circumstances. I’m currently in a religious debate and there are several theists who constantly criticize me for personal attacks when I’ve done nothing but attack Christianity as a belief system.

      1. Yeah, that happens a lot. I think we need to remind them that religions aren’t people. I think misquoting Romney on this is a pretty light hearted way of pointing that out. It dials down the tension.

        1. You also have to remember that the religious, by and large, happen to think that religion is inherently special, that it deserves special rules and special consideration. I don’t buy into that one bit. In the aforementioned debate, I had someone present his “conversion story” and when I pointed out that he had simply assumed, out of thin air, that God had anything whatsoever to do with the events of his story, he went on a whine-fest, I was being so mean to him, how could I doubt that something that was so emotionally meaningful to him was not 100% true and accurate?

          It’s no wonder these people are so screwed up.

    2. It becomes even more an issue with Islam. People who criticize the religion of Islam are immediately labelled as “Islamophobic” and accused of hating Muslim people. It is also much easier to make jokes about Christianity. You do not have to fear for your health and safety.

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