Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Oct 12, 2012 in Election 2012, Politics | 4 comments

Paul Ryan’s Big Bird Moment

The Vice Presidential debate brought out a lot of interesting “stuff.” Even though it came toward the end of the debate, the one thing about this debate that I don’t think we can forget about is something that Paul Ryan said. When asked what personal characteristic he would bring to the table, he actually said, “Honesty.” In my opinion, that was the Big Bird moment of the debate.

Honestly, I can’t believe he got away with saying that. The man who has been nicknamed, “Ly’n Ryan” because of his inability to not tell the truth on even meaningless trivia like his marathon time, actually said that he brings “honesty” to the table. Now that’s the lie of all lies if you ask me. If I were the Obama campaign, that would be my next commercial. Lots of clips of Ryan obviously lying, a clip a him saying that he brings honesty to the table, and then following it up with, “How can you believe another word they say.”

Biden didn’t call Ryan a liar straight up, but he did use a few synonyms. Ryan was full of “Malarkey” and he said a lot of, “Stuff.” Biden at one point even got as far as saying, “I wish he would just tell… be a little more candid.” I thought that was an underrated moment. It gets to the heart of the problem in so many ways. There is no doubt that Paul Ryan is a serial liar. But the problem is that no one seems to be allowed to call him out on it. The moderator didn’t, the media won’t, and even Joe Biden stopped short of stating the obvious.

That’s the thing about Joe Biden. In many ways he is the standard politician. As Senator in Delaware, he certainly took legalized bribes (campaign donations) from the credit card industry in exchange for helping them to rip off the American people. He is no political light weight. He’s been around the block a few times but at least you know that when he slips up, he is being honest. Biden goes off script often and does what the media calls, “gaffes,” but those gaffes are always his true thoughts and feelings. This is a point he attempted to make clear in the debate when Ryan tried to back away from Romney’s 47% comment. Interestingly enough, just last week Romney was bragging about that same comment and now he has flip flopped on it and is running as far away from it as possible.

With honesty challenged Ryan and flip flopping Romney, how can anyone honestly trust these guys?

Enhanced by Zemanta

  • Bob of QF

    I am always and ever appalled every time I hear a middle class or lower class worker singing the praises of people like Romney…. as if Mr Richy-rich-Romney had the slightest care about the working class folk.

    Are these people truly as blind to reality as they seem? Apparently so– they continue to vote for the party of the rich, by the rich and for the rich, at the expense of everyone not-rich.

  • Larry Roth

    Excellent metaphor: “The Big Bird moment.” My jaw dropped when I heard Ryan claim honesty as an attribute of his.

  • im-skeptical

    I think it’s testimony to the gullibility of the Republican voters. This whole campaign by both Ryan and Romney strikes me as being so loaded with blatant lies and reversals of position, it exceeds anything we’ve seen in the past. They seem to have come to the realization that this doesn’t matter to their voters. If the numbers don’t add up, they don’t care. If their policies favor the rich, no problem as long as they said they are for the middle class at one time or another. If the Republican voter hears Romney or Ryan take several completely different stances on an issue, it’s OK as long as one of them sounds good.

  • Copyleft

    Sorry, but the piont your making does not fit the media-narrative mold and will therefore be ignored. Only Democrats can be accused of flip-flopping and dishonesty; when Republican candidates do it, the matter is studiously ignored.

    To attack Republican candidates, you need admissions like Romney’s about contempt for the working class. There are rules to media storytelling, after all.